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Author Topic: Two or more lights scanning
TundraWookie
Knows what it's all about
Member # 1044

Icon 1 posted December 06, 2013 02:37 PM      Profile for TundraWookie           Edit/Delete Post 
I've pretty much been a solo night hunter, but have at times hunted with a partner. We usually just use one guy scanning and the other on the gun. On some occasions we'll split up on two sides of a road, basically back to back and use scan lights to each scan a side. What's your take on running double or more lights on stand? Effective? Detrimental? Ideas from those in the know are appreciated.
Posts: 857 | From: Alaska | Registered: Dec 2006  |  IP: Logged
Moe
Knows what it's all about
Member # 4494

Icon 1 posted December 06, 2013 07:50 PM      Profile for Moe           Edit/Delete Post 
Back in the day on very cold nights behind locked gates we sometimes called from the front seat of the truck with each guy lighting his side of his vehicle. That's not optimal but it worked.

One night Thumper McDowell and another guy were calling from the front seat of a station wagon when a gray fox jumped in the back window. Another night Bernie Creamer and his partner were calling from the front seat when a bobcat attacked his arm and started tearing it up. He was on the passenger side falling asleep when it happened.

IMO the best way to call at night is what you described. One guy on the light and call and the other on the gun. I don't understand why two guys lighting would be required.

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I snatch kisses. And vice versa.

Posts: 531 | From: Oregon | Registered: Nov 2013  |  IP: Logged
TA17Rem
Hello, I'm the legendary Tim Anderson, Field Marshall, Southern Minneesota Sector
Member # 794

Icon 1 posted December 06, 2013 08:31 PM      Profile for TA17Rem           Edit/Delete Post 
May be different in other parts of the country but here too much light just messes up a night stand especially when calling over snow..

[ December 06, 2013, 08:32 PM: Message edited by: TA17Rem ]

Posts: 4448 | From: S.D. | Registered: Jan 2006  |  IP: Logged
TundraWookie
Knows what it's all about
Member # 1044

Icon 1 posted December 06, 2013 08:52 PM      Profile for TundraWookie           Edit/Delete Post 
I think that the snow and the reflection off of it definitely plays a factor on two lights being a negative. Add to that that the snow is built up in the trees and it has to cast big shadows into the woods that would likely spook critters more with moving lights. Just my thoughts.
Posts: 857 | From: Alaska | Registered: Dec 2006  |  IP: Logged
Leonard
HMFIC
Member # 2

Icon 1 posted December 07, 2013 07:27 AM      Profile for Leonard   Author's Homepage   Email Leonard         Edit/Delete Post 
I have always felt that contrary to logic, two lights are a negative. I could talk at length on the subject, but just take my word for it.

Bernie Creamer? I know him! Used to, anyway. He used a 270Weatherby, sticks in my mind. In fact, he gave me one. I had asked and later, he remembered and gave it to me. I have a cigar box of various cartridges, wanted it for my collection.

Good hunting. El Bee

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EL BEE Knows It All and Done It All. Don't piss me off!

Posts: 24298 | From: Upland, CA | Registered: Jan 2003  |  IP: Logged
Moe
Knows what it's all about
Member # 4494

Icon 1 posted December 07, 2013 07:53 AM      Profile for Moe           Edit/Delete Post 
Two lights working on a regular stand could wind up like a Chinese fire drill. If each guy has a task like either lighting and calling or shooting it cuts down on time and raises efficiency. That's what a good team does.

I agree with Leonard.

Bernie lives in Lake Havasu City now. He's pushing 80 and still very active.

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I snatch kisses. And vice versa.

Posts: 531 | From: Oregon | Registered: Nov 2013  |  IP: Logged
TundraWookie
Knows what it's all about
Member # 1044

Icon 1 posted December 07, 2013 06:29 PM      Profile for TundraWookie           Edit/Delete Post 
I know that you guys have probably been night hunting longer than I've been alive, so I take heed if you're warning. I'm not saying you're old...just that the age gap is probably there I'm guessing. [Smile]

The only animals I've killed at night up here have been solo. My method is similar I'm guessing to the team method, except I use a headlamp and then use the light on the rifle when it's time to shoot. On lynx called in with lights only one has gotten away on me and that was because that guy got the jump behind me on a tall hill that I did not realize was back in the woods. Too thick of timber to get a good shot through. All other felines have simply gone Kamakazi and strutted right on in. Canines on the other hand not so much. I get them, but many times they just lock up or move back into the woods and vanish.

I appreciate the information, this is good stuff to learn from.

Posts: 857 | From: Alaska | Registered: Dec 2006  |  IP: Logged
TA17Rem
Hello, I'm the legendary Tim Anderson, Field Marshall, Southern Minneesota Sector
Member # 794

Icon 1 posted December 07, 2013 07:17 PM      Profile for TA17Rem           Edit/Delete Post 
Hey Wookie; Been trying out some of those green cap lights from Cabela's noticed I get much less shadow with them over snow. Plan to give them a try later on in the season..
Posts: 4448 | From: S.D. | Registered: Jan 2006  |  IP: Logged
TundraWookie
Knows what it's all about
Member # 1044

Icon 1 posted December 07, 2013 07:25 PM      Profile for TundraWookie           Edit/Delete Post 
I've tried the Red, Greeen and the typical White. The Red LED lights definitely cast the least amount of shadows for sure and the canines definitely are more prone to come in a bit closer. I've used a variety of White LED's too for scanning and I've noticed that certain LED's are less prone to spooking animals. I can tell that the frequency of the LED's light during light snow is totally different. Sometimes, certain LED's make snow look like it's strobing before my eyes...drives me nuts and I almost go into seizures. So I'd wager a guess that whatever the different LED modules are, some are more and less prone to spook out wary critters. Red is definitely the way to go it seems. Lynx don't care though. I can scan them on the highest power LightForce light I have in white and those guys still just trot on in like they're going to get the free Happy Meal Rabbit at the end of that light tube.
Posts: 857 | From: Alaska | Registered: Dec 2006  |  IP: Logged
Leonard
HMFIC
Member # 2

Icon 1 posted December 07, 2013 09:27 PM      Profile for Leonard   Author's Homepage   Email Leonard         Edit/Delete Post 
Hey Wookie, I keep telling people not to give up on cats. GO AFTER THEM! If he walked away up and over a hill, I think you would have had an excellent of lighting him up as soon as you gained the top of the hill. Never let one leave without chasing after him. Almost guaranteed. They don't run away, they just mosey.

Good hunting. El Bee

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EL BEE Knows It All and Done It All. Don't piss me off!

Posts: 24298 | From: Upland, CA | Registered: Jan 2003  |  IP: Logged
TundraWookie
Knows what it's all about
Member # 1044

Icon 1 posted December 07, 2013 10:05 PM      Profile for TundraWookie           Edit/Delete Post 
Edited to add: I couldn't make it up that hill. It was an impenetrable, steep nasty thing with a fortress of black spruce. Getting up it would've likely taken me an hour and 10 tons of snow dumping on my head through it.

That's funny Leonard, I've told people the same thing. I was out late one night with a buddy and he we were going back to the highway on this Alaska Pipeline access road. He said he saw eyes and thought it was a lynx. I stopped the truck and just told him to run up where he saw it and keep his headlamp going. Anyways, he books off down the road 100 yards or so and as I'm watching from the truck raises the rifle and shoots. Instant Lynx!! I tell people if they shoot at a lynx and it vanishes....start running towards where you saw it. Even better is to start running and keep a mouth-call going at the same time to keep that cat's interest. Bobcats and Lynx sound about the same as far as reactions and lack of fear towards people.

[ December 07, 2013, 11:16 PM: Message edited by: TundraWookie ]

Posts: 857 | From: Alaska | Registered: Dec 2006  |  IP: Logged


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