The New Huntmastersbbs!


Post New Topic  New Poll  Post A Reply
my profile | register | search | faq | forum home
  next oldest topic   next newest topic
» The New Huntmastersbbs!   » Predator Hunting   » Close quarter calling ( brush areas/dense vegetation) questions

 - UBBFriend: Email this page to someone!    
Author Topic: Close quarter calling ( brush areas/dense vegetation) questions
ATexan
Knows what it's all about
Member # 6799

Icon 1 posted November 02, 2018 08:02 AM      Profile for ATexan   Email ATexan         Edit/Delete Post 
I have a few questions about call in in areas with thick cover. Most of my calling areas are river bottoms. These are anywhere from 50 to 200ish yards wide open river bottom and sand breaks along the edges. I tend to have more dogs come in close range when I make a stand in the thick cover rather than making a stand on the river bed. Now I have seen plenty of dogs walk causaly along the rivers edge and even cross the river. I always see tracks along the edges.
My questions are 1. Why do coyote tend to come in on calls in the brush rather than say on the edge of the open sand ( ecaller or hand calling on the river bed). 2. Why are they not crossing the river when I know they are there because I have located them using a howler. 3. are river beds a natural boundary line for these animals?
4. What is a good distance for the gunners to be positioned from the caller? I have always put the shot gunner down wind of the caller say about 50 to 75 yrds and the rifleman up wind of the caller always positioned so he can keep an eye on the river bed with the wind blowing parallel to us. 5. What do u suggest for stand time length.
Thanks for any input guys.

Posts: 43 | From: Texas | Registered: Mar 2018  |  IP: Logged
Leonard
HMFIC
Member # 2

Icon 1 posted November 02, 2018 09:02 AM      Profile for Leonard   Author's Homepage   Email Leonard         Edit/Delete Post 
Those are good questions. I agree about one thing. Sometimes ideal looking dry washes and river bottoms seem perfect, and they actually could be boundaries, so hard to say why you don't get the action you expect?

Somebody here could tackle one or two of the questions, I'm sure.

Good hunting. El Bee

PS if not, I will give it a try.

--------------------
EL BEE Knows It All and Done It All.
Don't piss me off!

Posts: 26048 | From: Upland, CA | Registered: Jan 2003  |  IP: Logged
Leonard
HMFIC
Member # 2

Icon 1 posted November 03, 2018 12:10 PM      Profile for Leonard   Author's Homepage   Email Leonard         Edit/Delete Post 
Territories. I have never figured this one out, but there is a place between California and Nevada, that has never been as good as it looks, if by looks, you are going by sign, as in scat, every fifty yards along the two track. It's amazing, kinda like a cat toilet, SEVERAL MILES of nothing but coyote shit! However, I've never killed a coyote along there, never even seen one! So if it's a boundary, the "stay away" message must be loud and clear?

Anyway, what looks like a geographic boundary of a territory to humans is not always the same for a coyote. Then, just to confuse things further, sometimes it is. As we know, when times are tough, coyotes tolerate transients and other packs at a food source or scarce water. This has to be because I have seen groups of between 20 and 50 animals all together and they can't be family related.

Anyway, the man asks a question....who's got answers? Don't be afraid it's gonna be on the test.

Good hunting. El Bee

--------------------
EL BEE Knows It All and Done It All.
Don't piss me off!

Posts: 26048 | From: Upland, CA | Registered: Jan 2003  |  IP: Logged
Kokopelli
SENIOR DISCOUNT & Dispenser of Sage Advice
Member # 633

Icon 1 posted November 03, 2018 01:08 PM      Profile for Kokopelli   Author's Homepage           Edit/Delete Post 
$.02 worth.
Generally, when I'm calling in dogs, I'm too close to a ranch.
(1) Brush is the coyote's security blanket. I probably call tighter stands that most but every year I seem to bounce shot cups off of a couple of coyotes.
(2) Sometimes, the only answer is 'Just to piss you off.'
(3) Yes, no, maybe, sometimes.
(4) The learning curve for setting up stands never ends......so try to learn something once in a while.
(5) Stand length will depend on a lot of things up to and including the guy in the red pick-up calling a couple of miles ahead of you. (Inside H/M joke) All that you can do is trial & error to find what works for you.

--------------------
When urinating outdoors, remember to face East, toward Mecca whenever possible.

Posts: 5143 | From: Under a wandering star | Registered: Apr 2005  |  IP: Logged
Leonard
HMFIC
Member # 2

Icon 1 posted November 03, 2018 03:05 PM      Profile for Leonard   Author's Homepage   Email Leonard         Edit/Delete Post 
I'm not so sure he means feral or ranch dogs? In our clubs, we very often referred to coyotes as dogs, and not because we didn't know the difference. Same with cats. I have a trophy upstairs that reads, LARGEST DOG on a State Hunt. That's what they do in the pool at big hunt contests, they say, "Littlest Dog", and not pup coyote. Anyway, just a guess?

Good hunting. El Bee

PS and by the way, I have called in small groups of dogs before, and I know damned well they aren't ranch dogs because there isn't a village of any size for many miles. I once had a village dog, it was a german Shepard type. That dog followed us for about five miles through some prime stuff that we would have loved to hunt but that dog kept chasing us. And, he was friendly.

On the other hand, when calling on the Navajo Reservation, you can't avoid calling dogs and I don't care how far you try to get away from hogans. And, they are all clones! But they are smart dogs. Just as soon as they realize that you aren't a coyote or a rabbit, they lose interest real fast. It's really hard to believe unless you see it.

--------------------
EL BEE Knows It All and Done It All.
Don't piss me off!

Posts: 26048 | From: Upland, CA | Registered: Jan 2003  |  IP: Logged
ATexan
Knows what it's all about
Member # 6799

Icon 1 posted November 03, 2018 04:44 PM      Profile for ATexan   Email ATexan         Edit/Delete Post 
Sorry I call coyotes, dogs sometimes. Trying not to confuse ya, I should have clarified that.
No what I was meant was when I go out hunting and use a howler to locate, I get a response usually from 2 to 3 separate packs/ pairs... Hard to tell sometimes how many are howling back, I have always been amazed how much noise a small pack can make... Anyways, I get a sense of where they are and make my way to a stand so that I will be close enough hopefully for them to come in to my calls but not to expose me or my scent to the area of interest. 9/10 the coyote will always be A. Down wind of the call and B. On the same side of the river as the call. I very rarely seen them cross the open sand even if wind is right for a down approach while callling. It seems odd even though I have watched many a coyote walk the edge and even cross where there is a foot and half of flowing water. I am just trying to get an idea if a open space will discourage a coyote from coming into a call if its on the opposite side of a river or wash when he has been kicked back in the thick stuff. I am at a loss because I hate to sneak across the river when I have in my mind made a a stealthy approach. Don't know if risk is worth it..

Posts: 43 | From: Texas | Registered: Mar 2018  |  IP: Logged
Leonard
HMFIC
Member # 2

Icon 1 posted November 03, 2018 07:42 PM      Profile for Leonard   Author's Homepage   Email Leonard         Edit/Delete Post 
I've seen coyotes run across streams at high speed. One time there was so much spray thrown up and backlit by the sun, I couldn't see a damned thing to track him through the scope. Then, as the wind carried all that spray away, he stopped and shook, (just like a dog) and turned around and looked at me. Well, it was really too far, I probably shouldn't but I popped him and he fell completely out of sight. This is kinda funny, but when I got out there, that water was pretty deep and I took off my Levis and boots and waded across, but I couldn't find him? Finally, I looked about 50 yards further out and saw what I thought was a fresh cow pie out there. Don't ask me why, but I decided to go look at it and it was a soaking wet coyote. I dragged him back across that cold stream and my partner was so impressed with the shot that he volunteered to buy me a steak dinner. And, he did, and I ate it. 25'06Ackley 100 grain Nosler, approximately 650 yards; which I never attempt just because it's such a hassle to find them. I'm pretty confident at 400 yards, but if they get past that, they won. Usually.

Good hunting. El Bee

I just remembered, I didn't take my pants off until we got back to the truck. Then I hung them out the window with the glass rolled up as we drove to dry them out. I just took off my boots and socks. Which, remembering, it was a tender slow walk back. Good thing it wasn't Arizona. The steak was at the next club meeting.

--------------------
EL BEE Knows It All and Done It All.
Don't piss me off!

Posts: 26048 | From: Upland, CA | Registered: Jan 2003  |  IP: Logged


All times are Pacific  
Post New Topic  New Poll  Post A Reply Close Topic    Move Topic    Delete Topic next oldest topic   next newest topic
 - Printer-friendly view of this topic
Hop To:

Contact Us | Huntmasters



Powered by Infopop Corporation
UBB.classicTM 6.3.0